Aggression in humans: What is its biological foundation?

@article{Albert1994AggressionIH,
  title={Aggression in humans: What is its biological foundation?},
  author={D. Albert and M. Walsh and R. H. Jonik},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={1994},
  volume={17},
  pages={405-425}
}
Although human aggression is frequently inferred to parallel aggression based on testosterone in nonprimate mammals, there is little concrete support for this position. High- and low-aggression individuals do not consistently differ in serum testosterone. Aggression does not change at puberty when testosterone levels increase. Aggression does not increase in hypogonadal males (or females) when exogenous testosterone is administered to support sexual activity. Similarly, there are no reports… Expand
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