Aggression in bottlenose dolphins: Evidence for sexual coercion, male-male competition, and female tolerance through analysis of tooth-rake marks and behaviour

@article{Scott2005AggressionIB,
  title={Aggression in bottlenose dolphins: Evidence for sexual coercion, male-male competition, and female tolerance through analysis of tooth-rake marks and behaviour},
  author={E. Scott and J. Mann and J. Watson-Capps and B. L. Sargeant and R. Connor},
  journal={Behaviour},
  year={2005},
  volume={142},
  pages={21-44}
}
  • E. Scott, J. Mann, +2 authors R. Connor
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • Behaviour
  • Aggressive behaviour is rarely observed, but may have a large impact on the social structure, relationships and interactions in animal societies. Long-term behavioural study of Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, suggests that males are more aggressive than females, and use sexual coercion during the breeding season, but age and sex-specific patterns of aggression have not been well documented. We analyzed tooth rake marks, an indirect measure of received conspecific… CONTINUE READING

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