Aggression by male bonobos against immature individuals does not fit with predictions of infanticide

@article{Gottfried2019AggressionBM,
  title={Aggression by male bonobos against immature individuals does not fit with predictions of infanticide},
  author={Hohmann Gottfried and L. Vigilant and R. Mundry and V. Behringer and M. Surbeck},
  journal={Aggressive Behavior},
  year={2019},
  volume={45},
  pages={300–309}
}
The selective advantage of male infanticide is enhancement of reproductive success of the aggressor. This implies that aggression is directed at individuals sired by others, infant loss shortens the mother's inter-birth interval, and the aggressor has a greater likelihood of siring the next offspring of the victims' mother. As these conditions are not always met, the occurrence of male infanticide is expected to vary, and hominoid primates offer an interesting example of variation in male… Expand

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