Aggression among female lapwings, Vanellus vanellus

@article{Liker1997AggressionAF,
  title={Aggression among female lapwings,
 Vanellus vanellus
 
},
  author={Andr{\'a}s Liker and Tam{\'a}s Sz{\'e}kely},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1997},
  volume={54},
  pages={797-802}
}
Social monogamy is the most common pair bond in birds and one hypothesis for its prevalence is that already mated females ('residents') prevent other females from establishing a pair bond with their mates ('competition for male parental care' hypothesis). To investigate this hypothesis we experimentally induced aggressive behaviour in resident female lapwings by presenting a female dummy conspecific, and a male dummy as control, near their nests. Females attacked both dummies. However, the… Expand

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