Agent Orange and Cancer: An Overview for Clinicians

@article{Frumkin2003AgentOA,
  title={Agent Orange and Cancer: An Overview for Clinicians},
  author={Howard Frumkin},
  journal={CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians},
  year={2003},
  volume={53}
}
  • H. Frumkin
  • Published 1 July 2003
  • Medicine
  • CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Approximately 3 million Americans served in the armed forces in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. Some of them (as well as some Vietnamese combatants and civilians, and members of the armed forces of other nations) were exposed to defoliant mixtures, including Agent Orange. Evidence suggests some lasting health effects from these exposures, including certain cancers. This article reviews the evidence on cancer risk after Agent Orange exposure. Data sources include studies of Vietnam veterans… 
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TLDR
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Possible effects of agent orange and posttraumatic stress disorder on hyperglycemia in Korean veterans from the US-Vietnam war
TLDR
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The Epidemiology of Pesticide Exposure and Cancer: A Review
TLDR
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References

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TLDR
After much dispute of a causal association between exposure to herbicides containing TCDD and occurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, two simultaneous case-control studies were set up in Vietnam to examine possible relationships.
Soft tissue sarcomas and military service in Vietnam: a case comparison group analysis of hospital patients.
TLDR
A hospital-based case comparison group study was undertaken to examine, through a comprehensive review of medical records and military personnel records, the association between previous military service in Vietnam and soft tissue sarcomas.
A case-control study of lung cancer among Vietnam veterans.
TLDR
It is concluded that there is no evidence of increased risk in lung cancer associated with service in Vietnam at this time.
Serum dioxin and cancer in veterans of Operation Ranch Hand.
TLDR
Overall, it is found that there is no consistent evidence of a dose-response gradient and no significant increase in cancer risk in the High dioxin exposure category, the subgroup of greatest a priori interest.
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TLDR
It is hypothesized that a major route of current and past exposures is from the movement of dioxin from soil into river sediment, then into fish, and from fish consumption into people.
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TLDR
Elevated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) levels as high as 1832 ppt were found in milk lipid collected from southern Vietnam in 1970, and levels up to 103 pptwere found in adipose tissue in the 1980s.
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TLDR
The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam; the two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles.
Dioxins and dioxin-like chemicals in blood and semen of American Vietnam veterans from the state of Michigan.
TLDR
Elevated blood TCDD levels, probably related to Agent Orange exposure, can be detected between two and three decades after potential exposure in some American veterans, suggesting a possible mechanism for male-mediated adverse reproductive outcomes following Agent Orange or other dioxin exposure.
Soft tissue sarcoma and military service in Vietnam: a case-control study.
TLDR
Vietnam veterans in general did not have an increased risk of STS when compared to those men who had never been in Vietnam and subgroups of Vietnam veterans who had higher estimated opportunities for Agent Orange exposure seemed to be at greater risk ofSTS when their counterparts in Vietnam were taken as a reference group.
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