Ageing and the self-reference effect in memory

@article{Gutchess2007AgeingAT,
  title={Ageing and the self-reference effect in memory},
  author={Angela H. Gutchess and Elizabeth A. Kensinger and Carolyn Yoon and Daniel L. Schacter},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2007},
  volume={15},
  pages={822 - 837}
}
The present study investigates potential age differences in the self-reference effect. Young and older adults incidentally encoded adjectives by deciding whether the adjective described them, described another person (Experiments 1 & 2), was a trait they found desirable (Experiment 3), or was presented in upper case. Like young adults, older adults exhibited superior recognition for self-referenced items relative to the items encoded with the alternate orienting tasks, but self-referencing did… Expand
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False memory in aging resulting from self-referential processing.
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2013
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Findings indicate an increased response bias to self-referencing that increased hit rates for both older and younger adults but also increased false alarms as information became more self-descriptive, particularly for older adults. Expand
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