Age structure and crime rates: The conflicting evidence

@article{Marvell1991AgeSA,
  title={Age structure and crime rates: The conflicting evidence},
  author={Thomas B. Marvell and Carlisle E. Jr. Moody},
  journal={Journal of Quantitative Criminology},
  year={1991},
  volume={7},
  pages={237-273}
}
  • T. Marvell, C. Moody
  • Published 1 September 1991
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Quantitative Criminology
Because arrest rates are especially high for teenagers and young adults, criminologists have long contended that age structure changes affect crime trends. In recent years, however, this belief has been drawn into question because crime has not declined even though high-crime age groups have shrunk. We argue that the age/crime relationship is probably exaggerated because the high arrest rates for younger persons are due partly to their lesser ability to escape arrest, younger persons commit… Expand
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