Age structure, dispersion and diet of a population of stoats (Mustela erminea) in southern Fiordland during the decline phase of the beech mast cycle

@article{Purdey2004AgeSD,
  title={Age structure, dispersion and diet of a population of stoats (Mustela erminea) in southern Fiordland during the decline phase of the beech mast cycle},
  author={D. Purdey and C. King and B. Lawrence},
  journal={New Zealand Journal of Zoology},
  year={2004},
  volume={31},
  pages={205 - 225}
}
Abstract The dispersion, age structure and diet of stoats (Mustela erminea) in beech forest in the Borland and Grebe Valleys, Fiordland National Park, were examined during December and January 2000/01, 20 months after a heavy seed‐fall in 1999. Thirty trap stations were set along a 38‐km transect through almost continuous beech forest, at least 1 km apart. Mice were very scarce (<1 capture per 100 trap nights, C/100TN) along two standard index lines placed at either end of the transect… Expand
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