Age differences in tactile pattern recognition at the fingertip

@article{Manning2006AgeDI,
  title={Age differences in tactile pattern recognition at the fingertip},
  author={H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Manning and François Tremblay},
  journal={Somatosensory \& Motor Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={23},
  pages={147 - 155}
}
Young (21–26 years, n = 20) and old (55–86 years, n = 25) participants were tested for their ability to recognize raised letters (6-mm high, 1-mm relief) by touch. Spatial resolution thresholds were also measured with grating domes to derive an index of the degree of afferent innervation at the fingertip. Letter recognition in the young group was very consistent and highly accurate (mean, 86% correct), contrasting with the performance of the old group, which was more variable and comparatively… Expand
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