Afterword

@article{Cooper2013Afterword,
  title={Afterword},
  author={Anwen Cooper and Christopher A Green and Zena Kamash and Letty ten Harkel},
  journal={Landscapes},
  year={2013},
  volume={14},
  pages={113 - 114}
}
In his introduction to this themed edition of Landscapes, Gosden comments that ‘the papers in this issue concentrate on one aspect of scale, the large scale’, interpreting this as a response to the huge increase in available data since PPG16. This is in itself an interesting outcome of a call for papers for the June 2012 symposium that did not, in any way, define the meaning of the concept of ‘scale’, leaving it entirely to the participants’ discretion which aspect of this complex and multi… 

References

SHOWING 1-4 OF 4 REFERENCES

Perspective Matters: Traversing Scale through Archaeological Practice

Anthropology, Strathern (1991:xiii) notes, is concerned to demonstrate the complexity of social phenomena. But in the demonstration, phenomena must be simplified sufficiently to make this complexity

The Early Middle Ages: a scale-based approach

and were discussed at different stages by the project members. I owe them all recognition for their input, as well as to Dr Richard Reece, who attended the spring 2007 plenary meeting at Woolstone

Phenomenological space-time: toward an experiential relativity.

It is suggested that spatial scale may be a principal mediator in the experience of time as subjects observing differently scaled environments undergo systematic shifts in theExperience of time.