After Helsinki: a multidisciplinary review of the relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer, with emphasis on studies published during 1997-2004.

@article{Henderson2004AfterHA,
  title={After Helsinki: a multidisciplinary review of the relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer, with emphasis on studies published during 1997-2004.},
  author={Douglas W. Henderson and Klaus R{\"o}delsperger and H. J. Woitowitz and James Leigh},
  journal={Pathology},
  year={2004},
  volume={36 6},
  pages={
          517-50
        }
}
Despite an extensive literature, the relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer remains the subject of controversy, related to the fact that most asbestos-associated lung cancers occur in those who are also cigarette smokers: because smoking represents the strongest identifiable lung cancer risk factor among many others, and lung cancer is not uncommon across industrialised societies, analysis of the combined (synergistic) effects of smoking and asbestos on lung cancer risk is a… Expand
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