African Philosophy and the Decolonisation of Education in Africa: Some critical reflections

@article{Higgs2012AfricanPA,
  title={African Philosophy and the Decolonisation of Education in Africa: Some critical reflections},
  author={Philip Higgs},
  journal={Educational Philosophy and Theory},
  year={2012},
  volume={44},
  pages={37 - 55}
}
  • P. Higgs
  • Published 1 January 2012
  • Education
  • Educational Philosophy and Theory
The liberation of Africa and its peoples from centuries of racially discriminatory colonial rule and domination has far‐reaching implications for educational thought and practice. The transformation of educational discourse in Africa requires a philosophical framework that respects diversity, acknowledges lived experience and challenges the hegemony of Western forms of universal knowledge. In this article I reflect critically on whether African philosophy, as a system of African knowledge(s… 

Attaining epistemic justice through transformation and decolonisation of education curriculum in Africa

ABSTRACT In this paper, I explore the position that the transformation and decolonisation of the education curriculum in Africa constitute a way of attaining epistemic justice. Drawing on Miranda

The relational legacies of colonialism: peace education and reconciliation in Rwanda

Abstract This article argues that decolonising educational undertakings is a difficult task, even when the ambitions to apply decolonising approaches are clearly articulated. Our case analysis of two

Epistemic decoloniality of westernised higher education: A discourse on curriculum justice and knowledge integration at historically white universities in South Africa

  • Wilson B Asea
  • Sociology
    Arts and Humanities in Higher Education
  • 2022
This article seeks to delve deeper into the discourse about the epistemic decoloniality of Westernised higher education in South Africa. Discrete academic studies have indicated that African

Decolonising the Criminology curriculum in South Africa: Views and experiences of lecturers and postgraduate students

Institutions of higher learning (IHL) in Africa continue to replicate Western ideologies without considering the continent’s context and realities (Mswazie & Mudyahoto 2013:170). It is almost three

Decolonising Education in Africa: Implementing the Right to Education by Re-Appropriating Culture and Indigeneity

Education in many African states is comparatively characterised by inadequate availability, accessibility, acceptability and adaptability of education. Nevertheless, evaluations focusing on lack of

Decolonial Reflections on the Zimbabwean Primary and Secondary School Curriculum Reform Journey

The Zimbabwean curriculum reform journey is shaped by the weight of cultural technologies of domination employed in the country during British imperial rule (1890–1980). Moreover, these imperial

21st Century African Philosophy of Adult and Human Resource Education in Southern Africa.

This paper will attempt to define a philosophy of adult education for the purpose of workforce development in Southern Africa. The different influences such as Ubuntu and communalism, indigenous

Decolonising higher education in Africa: Arriving at a glocal solution

The recent student unrest in South African public higher education institutions highlighted the call for the decolonisation of education across post-colonial countries. This research explored the

Challenging epistemicide through transformation and Africanisation of the philosophy curriculum in Africa

The position that I defend in this article is that the transformation and Africanisation of the philosophy curriculum in universities in Africa is necessary in order to reverse epistemicide. It is

The African renaissance and the transformation of the higher education curriculum in South Africa

ABSTRACT The curriculum is a critical element in the transformation of higher education, and as a result, I argue for the inclusion of what I refer to as an African epistemic in higher education
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 103 REFERENCES

Towards an indigenous African educational discourse: a philosophical reflection

AbstractThe liberation of Africa and its peoples from centuries of racially discriminatory colonial rule and domination has far reaching implications for educational thought and practice. The

Africanisation of education and the search for relevance and context

As the 21st century dawned, some African intellectuals were already contemplating an education system based on African philosophy and African values. These intellectuals were motioning for an

African Philosophy in Search of Identity

Acknowledgments 1. Logocentrism and Emotivism: Two Systems in Struggle for Control of Identity 2. Tempels and the Setting of Ethnophilosophy 3. Systematic Ethnophilosophy 4. Language and Reality 5.

Education, Responsibility and Democratic Justice: Cultivating friendship to alleviate some of the injustices on the African continent

In South Africa there is widespread recognition amongst university educators that the new outcomes‐based education (OBE) system can prevent instrumental thinking, particularly in view of OBE's agenda

In My Father's House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture

Examines the cultural and political dimensions of what it means to be an African today. The author probes the history of the idea of Africa to illuminate an African identity that extends into the

Tradition and modernity

This book offers a philosophical interpretation and critical analysis of the African cultural experience in modern times. In their attempt to evolve ways of life appropriate to our modern world

Moving the Centre: The Struggle for Cultural Freedoms

I: FREEING CULTURE FROM EUROCENTRISM - Moving the Cen tre: Towards a Pluralism of Cultures - Creating Space for a Hundred Flowers to Bloom: The Wealth of a Common Global Culture - The Universality of

‘Africanisation’, African identities and emancipation in contemporary South Africa

This article problematises the concept of ‘Africanisation’ as a response to colonial conquest and apartheid rule, bearing both political and knowledge consequences. It aims to rescue ‘Africanisation’

Poverty Power and Partnerships in Educational Development: A post-victimology perspective

An end-of-century critique of the political and economic assumptions underlying five decades of international development assistance conceives it as a system of structural violence that prevented the

Poverty Power and Partnerships in Educational Development: A post-victimology perspective

An end-of-century critique of the political and economic assumptions underlying five decades of international development assistance conceives it as a system of structural violence that prevented the
...