Affinities of Palaeospiza bella and the Phylogeny and Biogeography of Mousebirds (Coliiformes)

@inproceedings{Ksepka2009AffinitiesOP,
  title={Affinities of Palaeospiza bella and the Phylogeny and Biogeography of Mousebirds (Coliiformes)},
  author={Daniel T. Ksepka and Julia A. Clarke},
  year={2009}
}
ABSTRACT. Palaeospiza bella was described as an oscine songbird in the late 19th century. The late Eocene age of the holotype specimen would make it the oldest Northern Hemisphere record of the Passeriformes. However, few recent workers have accepted the placement of P. bella within Passeriformes, and the higher relationships of this fossil have remained controversial. We show that P. bella is a member of the Coliiformes (mousebirds) and represents the latest North American occurrence of a… Expand
A new specimen of the Early Eocene Masillacolius brevidactylus and its implications for the evolution of feeding specializations in mousebirds (Coliiformes)
TLDR
A new skeleton of the Early Eocene stem group mousebird Masillacolius brevidactylus is described, which for the first time provides information on the skull morphology of this unusual coliiform species, and strengthens the supposition that long, blade-like retroarticular processes are plesiomorphic for a coliiform subclade, which also includes the extant species. Expand
New data on the anatomy and palaeobiology of sandcoleid mousebirds (Aves, Coliiformes) from the early Eocene of Messel
  • G. Mayr
  • Biology
  • Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments
  • 2018
TLDR
It is hypothesised that differences in the tail morphology of sandcoleids and coliids may have been due to changes in the habitual perching posture, which occurred early in the evolutionary history of the Coliidae. Expand
A new zygodactylid species indicates the persistence of stem passerines into the early Oligocene in North America
TLDR
The geographic and temporal range expansion provided by the new taxon together with avian other taxa with limited fossil records suggests a similar pattern of retraction in North America followed by Europe. Expand
A North American stem turaco, and the complex biogeographic history of modern birds
TLDR
P phylogenetic analyses support the enigmatic fossil bird Foro panarium Olson 1992 from the early Eocene (Wasatchian) of Wyoming as a stem turaco (Neornithes: Pan-Musophagidae), a clade that is presently endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Expand
A Laurasian origin for a pantropical bird radiation is supported by genomic and fossil data (Aves: Coraciiformes)
TLDR
The first complete species tree of Coraciiformes is presented, produced with 4858 ultraconserved elements, which supports two clades: Old World-restricted bee-eaters, rollers and ground-rollers; and New World todies and motmots, and cosmopolitan kingfishers. Expand
Podargiform Affinities of the Enigmatic Fluvioviridavis platyrhamphus and the Early Diversification of Strisores (“Caprimulgiformes” + Apodiformes)
TLDR
The well-preserved mandible and palate of the new specimen demonstrate that many of the unique characteristics of the skull that characterize the crown frogmouth clade Podargidae arose early in the evolutionary history of the clade, over 50 million years ago. Expand
The Biogeography of Coelurosaurian Theropods and its Impact on their Evolutionary History
TLDR
The results statistically favour the DIVALIKE+J and DEC+J models, supporting continental vicariance as an important factor in coelurosaurian evolution, and recognise the importance of Europe as a dispersal centre and gateway in the Early Cretaceous, as well as other vicarance events like those triggered by the disappearance of land-bridges. Expand
Combined phylogenetic analysis of a new North American fossil species confirms widespread Eocene distribution for stem rollers (Aves, Coracii)
TLDR
A nearly complete skeleton of a new species of stem roller from the early Eocene Green River Formation of North America is reported, providing evidence of further ecological diversity in early stem Coracii and convergence on crown morphologies. Expand
Unexpected larger distribution of paleogene stem-rollers (AVES, CORACII): new evidence from the Eocene of Patagonia, Argentina
TLDR
The unexpected presence of a stem-Coracii in the Eocene of South America indicates that this clade had a more widespread distribution than previously hypothesized, already extending into the Southern Hemisphere by the early Eocene. Expand
The early fossil record of perching birds ( Passeriformes )
Introduction The fossil record of the perching birds or passerines (Passeriformes) is very scarce and not well studied, but new discoveries and reinvestigations during the past few years supplementExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 47 REFERENCES
UNUSUAL TARSOMETATARSUS OF A MOUSEBIRD FROM THE PALEOGENE OF FRANCE AND THE RELATIONSHIPS OF SELMES PETERS, 1999
TLDR
A nearly complete tarsometatarsus of a mousebird from the middle Eocene to upper Oligocene fissure fillings of the Quercy in France is described, providing further evidence that Selmes is a stem lineage representative of the Coliidae and not a sandcoleid bird as assumed in the original description. Expand
Osteology and systematic position of the eocene primobucconidae (aves, coraciiformes sensu stricto), with first records from Europe
TLDR
The Primobucconidae is yet another taxon that exemplifies the great similarity between the early Eocene avifaunas of North America and Europe and constitutes the first record of stem group rollers in the New World. Expand
A new family of Eocene zygodactyl birds
TLDR
The Pseudasturidae, a new family of small Lower to Middle Eocene zygodactyl birds is described in the Middle Eolithic of Grube Messel, near Darmstadt (Hessen, Germany), and the presence of large processus supraorbitales, which closely resemble the corresponding structures found in falconiform birds is characteristic. Expand
Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion
TLDR
A phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes, confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the NeornIthes. Expand
A new eocene Chascacocolius-like mousebird (Aves: Coliiformes) with a remarkable gaping adaptation
TLDR
A skull of a new species of mousebird (Aves: Coliiformes) is described from the Middle Eocene of Messel in Germany, and the cranium and upper beak of Chascacocolius are seen for the first time in the new specimen; the latter shows a striking resemblance to some modern New World Blackbirds (Passeriformes: Icteridae). Expand
The phylogenetic relationships of the early Tertiary Primoscenidae and Sylphornithidae and the sister taxon of crown group piciform birds
  • G. Mayr
  • Biology
  • Journal of Ornithology
  • 2003
TLDR
If Passeriformes are indeed the sister group of the clade (Primoscenidae + Zygodactylidae), these birds would be an example that, in closely related taxa, selection towards the same functional demands can result in entirely different morphological specializations. Expand
A Fluvioviridavis-like bird from the Middle Eocene of Messel, Germany
A new avian taxon is described from the Middle Eocene of Messel in Germany. This bird closely resembles the Lower Eocene North American Fluvioviridavis platyrhamphus Mayr and Daniels, 2001.Expand
New or previously unrecorded avian taxa from the Middle Eocene of Messel (Hessen, Germany)
TLDR
An exceptionally well preserved skeleton of a sandcoleid bird gives new information on the osteology and feathering of sandcoelid birds, and an isolated foot of a gruiform bird is assigned to ldiornis cf. Expand
The mousebirds (Aves: Coliiformes) from the Middle Eocene of Grube Messel (Hessen, Germany)
TLDR
The monophyly of the Coliiformes (Sandcoleidae + Coliidae) is well corroborated with the recognition of ten osteological synapomorphies and the resemblances that exist between the Recent mousebirds and the “higher” non-passeriform and the passeriform birds respectively, most likely are due to convergence. Expand
The deep divergences of neornithine birds: a phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters
TLDR
A broad array of morphological characters (including both cranial and postcranial characters) are analyzed for an ingroup densely sampling Neornithes, with crown clade outgroups used to polarize these characters. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...