Affective agnosia: Expansion of the alexithymia construct and a new opportunity to integrate and extend Freud's legacy.

@article{Lane2015AffectiveAE,
  title={Affective agnosia: Expansion of the alexithymia construct and a new opportunity to integrate and extend Freud's legacy.},
  author={Richard D. Lane and Karen L Weihs and Anne M Herring and Alex Hishaw and Ryan D Smith},
  journal={Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews},
  year={2015},
  volume={55},
  pages={594-611}
}
We describe a new type of agnosia consisting of an impairment in the ability to mentally represent or know what one is feeling. Freud the neurologist coined the term "agnosia" in 1891 before creating psychoanalysis in 1895 but the term has not been previously applied to the domain of affective processing. We propose that the concept of "affective agnosia" advances the theory, measurement and treatment of what is now called "alexithymia," meaning "lack of words for emotion." We trace the origin… CONTINUE READING
Recent Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 18 times over the past 90 days. VIEW TWEETS

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 27 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 187 references

Mentalizing in the Development and Treatment of Attachment

  • R. D. Lane
  • Neuroscience and B llen, J.,
  • 2013
Highly Influential
10 Excerpts

Emotion-Focused Therapy: Coaching Clients to Work Through Their Feelings

  • L. Greenberg
  • 2002
Highly Influential
4 Excerpts

Disorders of Affect Regulation: Alexithymia in Medical and Psychiatric Illness

  • G. Taylor, R. Bagby, J. Parker
  • 1997
Highly Influential
6 Excerpts

Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Reason and the Human Brain

  • A. Damasio
  • 1994
Highly Influential
5 Excerpts

Alexithymia: a view of the psychosomatic process

  • J. Nemiah, H. Freyberger, P. Sifneos
  • Mod. Trends Psychosom. Med
  • 1976
Highly Influential
4 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…