Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives from Affective Neuroscience

@article{Davidson1998AffectiveSA,
  title={Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives from Affective Neuroscience},
  author={Richard J. Davidson},
  journal={Cognition \& Emotion},
  year={1998},
  volume={12},
  pages={307-330}
}
Individual differences in emotional reactivity or affective style can be decomposed into more elementary constituents. Several separable of affective style are identified such as the threshold for reactivity, peak amplitude of response, the rise time to peak and the recovery time. latter two characteristics constitute components of affective chronometry The circuitry that underlies two fundamental forms of motivation and and withdrawal-related processes-is described. Data on differences in… Expand

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