Aerosols in Dental Practice- A Neglected Infectious Vector

@article{Raghunath2016AerosolsID,
  title={Aerosols in Dental Practice- A Neglected Infectious Vector},
  author={Nithya Raghunath and Singh Meenakshi and H. S. Sreeshyla and Nitin Priyanka},
  journal={British microbiology research journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={14},
  pages={1-8}
}
An aerosol is a suspension of solid or liquid particles in air or other gaseous environment. Sources of bacterial aerosols exist within and outside the dental clinic. The generation of bacterial aerosols and splatters appears to be highest during dental procedures. The use of rotary dental and surgical instruments and air-water syringes generates visible infectious spray, that enclose large-particle spatter of water, saliva, microorganisms, blood, and other debris. Several infectious diseases… 
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