Aerosol Transmission of Infectious Disease

@article{Jones2015AerosolTO,
  title={Aerosol Transmission of Infectious Disease},
  author={Rachael M. Jones and Lisa M Brosseau},
  journal={Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={57},
  pages={501–508}
}
Objective: The concept of aerosol transmission is developed to resolve limitations in conventional definitions of airborne and droplet transmission. Methods: The method was literature review. Results: An infectious aerosol is a collection of pathogen-laden particles in air. Aerosol particles may deposit onto or be inhaled by a susceptible person. Aerosol transmission is biologically plausible when infectious aerosols are generated by or from an infectious person, the pathogen remains viable in… 
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