Aerobic exercise increases hippocampal volume in older women with probable mild cognitive impairment: a 6-month randomised controlled trial.

@article{Brinke2015AerobicEI,
  title={Aerobic exercise increases hippocampal volume in older women with probable mild cognitive impairment: a 6-month randomised controlled trial.},
  author={Lisanne F. ten Brinke and Niousha Bolandzadeh and L. Nagamatsu and Chun Liang Hsu and Jennifer C. Davis and Karim Miran-Khan and Teresa Liu-Ambrose},
  journal={British journal of sports medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={49 4},
  pages={248-54}
}
BACKGROUND Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a well-recognised risk factor for dementia and represents a vital opportunity for intervening. Exercise is a promising strategy for combating cognitive decline by improving brain structure and function. Specifically, aerobic training (AT) improved spatial memory and hippocampal volume in healthy community-dwelling older adults. In older women with probable MCI, we previously demonstrated that resistance training (RT) and AT improved memory. In this… CONTINUE READING
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