Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event

@article{Konhauser2011AerobicBP,
  title={Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event},
  author={K. Konhauser and S. Lalonde and N. Planavsky and E. Pecoits and T. Lyons and S. Mojzsis and O. Rouxel and M. Barley and C. Rosi{\`e}re and P. Fralick and L. Kump and A. Bekker},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={478},
  pages={369-373}
}
The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth’s land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and… Expand
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A shift from negative to positive copper isotopic compositions (δ65CuERM-AE633) in organic carbon-rich shales spanning the period 2.66–2.08 Ga is reported, providing insights into copper cycling and bioavailability coupled to Earth’s oxygenation history. Expand
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The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere is widely regarded to have played an important role in early-life evolution. Chromium (Cr) isotopes recorded in sedimentary rocks have been used to constrainExpand
The isotopic composition of authigenic chromium in anoxic marine sediments: A case study from the Cariaco Basin
Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging proxy for tracking redox processes at the Earth's surface. However, there has been limited exploration of the Cr isotope record of modern and recent marineExpand
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Abstract The enrichment and depletion of redox sensitive trace metals in marine sediments have been used extensively as paleoredox proxies. The trace metals in shale are comprised of both detritalExpand
The Great Oxygenation Event
Old sedimentary rocks record the history of oxygen in the form of redox-sensitive chemical species such as iron, uranium or cerium ions, and mass-independent fractionation of sulphur isotopes. TheseExpand
In situ trace metal analysis of Neoarchaean--Ordovician shallow-marine microbial-carbonate-hosted pyrites.
TLDR
Several redox-sensitive trace metals show interpretable temporal trends supporting earlier proposals derived from deep-water sedimentary rocks, and the first systematic study of trace metal inventories of the shallow-marine environment by analysis of microbial carbonate-hosted pyrite confirms a rise in the oceanic Mo inventory, implying the establishment of efficient deep-ocean ventilation. Expand
Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue
Abstract Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in ironExpand
Chromium isotopes in marine hydrothermal sediments
Abstract Hydrothermal chromium (Cr) cycling contributes to marine Cr inventories and their Cr isotopic composition, yet Cr isotope effects associated with this cycling remain poorly documented. HereExpand
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Abstract Oceanic element inventories derived from marine sedimentary rocks place important constraints on oxidative continental weathering in deep time, but there remains a scarcity in complementaryExpand
Chromium isotope fractionation during subduction-related metamorphism, black shale weathering, and hydrothermal alteration
Abstract Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging proxy for redox processes at Earth's surface. However, many geological reservoirs and isotope fractionation processes are still not well understood.Expand
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