Aedes (Finlaya) japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae), a Newly Recognized Mosquito in the United States: Analyses of Genetic Variation in the United States and Putative Source Populations

@inproceedings{Fonseca2001AedesJ,
  title={Aedes (Finlaya) japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae), a Newly Recognized Mosquito in the United States: Analyses of Genetic Variation in the United States and Putative Source Populations},
  author={Dina M. Fonseca and Scott R. Campbell and Wayne J. Crans and Motoyoshi Mogi and Ichiro Miyagi and Takako Toma and Mark S. Bullians and Theodore G. Andreadis and Richard Lee Berry and Benedict B. Pagac and Michael R. Sardelis and Richard C. Wilkerson},
  booktitle={Journal of medical entomology},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract Introduction of potential disease vectors into a new geographic area poses health risks to local human, livestock, and wildlife populations. It is therefore important to gain understanding of the dynamics of these invasions, in particular its sources, modes of spread after the introduction, and vectorial potential. We studied the population genetics of Aedes (Finlaya) japonicus japonicus (Theobald), an Asian mosquito that was recognized for the first time in the United States in 1998… 
Recently discovered Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) populations in The Netherlands and northern Germany resulted from a new introduction event and from a split from an existing population
BackgroundOriginally native to East Asia, Aedes japonicus japonicus, a potential vector of several arboviruses, has become one of the most invasive mosquito species in the world. After having
Population genetics of the invasive Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus (Diptera, Culicidae) in Germany—a re-evaluation in a time period of separate populations merging
The Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus, endemic to East Asia, is one of the most expansive mosquito species in the world and has as yet established in 15 countries of Europe. Within Germany, the
Molecular relationships of introduced Aedes japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) populations in British Columbia, Canada using mitochondrial DNA
TLDR
A molecular barcoding approach was applied to determine the phylogenetic relationship of Ae.
Distribution and genetic structure of Aedes japonicus japonicus populations (Diptera: Culicidae) in Germany
In recent years, the number of imported cases of arthropod-borne diseases in Europe, such as dengue fever, has increased steadily, as did the emergence and distribution of invasive insect vectors.
Population genetic structure of the Asian bush mosquito, Aedes japonicus (Diptera, Culicidae), in Belgium suggests multiple introductions
TLDR
The results point to the complexity of controlling invasive species, since 4 years of intense control measures were found to be not completely successful at eliminating this exotic at Natoye.
Invasion biology of Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae).
TLDR
Its successful invasion likely does not involve superior direct competitive abilities, but it is associated with the use of diverse larval habitats and a cold tolerance that allows an expanded seasonal activity range in temperate climates.
First report of established population of Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald, 1901) (Diptera, Culicidae) in the Netherlands
TLDR
It was decided not to implement any mosquito control measures for two reasons: this would require large scale biocidal treatment and community participation in order to be effective, and this species is not a confirmed vector of disease agents in the field.
Rapid spread and population genetics of Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in southeastern Europe (Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia)
TLDR
Genetic analysis suggests at least two introduction events into the surveyed area, possibly by vehicular traffic, into the study area is likely, but other origins, transportation routes and modes of entry appear to contribute.
INTRODUCTION AND ESTABLISHMENT OF AEDES (FINLAYA) JAPONICUS JAPONICUS (THEOBALD) ON THE ISLAND OF HAWAII: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARBOVIRUS TRANSMISSION
TLDR
Increased quarantine inspections, inspection and treatment of imported used tires and plants, disinsection of airline cargo holds, enhanced vector surveillance, and the development of sanitary corridors around airports and port facilities are necessary to reduce the introduction of vectors and pathogens.
Genetic Differentiation of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae), the Major Dengue Vector in Brazil
TLDR
Genetic polymorphism was high, and high levels of genetic differentiation existed both between different states and between cities or neighborhoods in each state, higher than those described for any other populations of A. aegypti.
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