Adverse reaction to metal debris: metallosis of the resurfaced hip

@article{Pritchett2012AdverseRT,
  title={Adverse reaction to metal debris: metallosis of the resurfaced hip},
  author={James W. Pritchett},
  journal={Current Orthopaedic Practice},
  year={2012},
  volume={23},
  pages={50–58}
}
  • J. Pritchett
  • Published 1 January 2012
  • Medicine
  • Current Orthopaedic Practice
The greatest concern after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing may be the development of metallosis. Metallosis is an adverse tissue reaction to the metal debris generated by the prosthesis and can be seen with implants and joint prostheses. The reasons patients develop metallosis are multifactorial, involving patient, surgical, and implant factors. Contributing factors may include component malposition, edge loading, impingement, third-body particles, and sensitivity to cobalt. The symptoms of… 
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