Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use

@article{Hall2009AdverseHE,
  title={Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use},
  author={Wayne D. Hall and Louisa Degenhardt},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2009},
  volume={374},
  pages={1383-1391}
}
For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes. We focus on adverse… Expand
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