Adverse events and placebo effects: African scientists, HIV, and ethics in the ‘global health sciences’

@article{Crane2010AdverseEA,
  title={Adverse events and placebo effects: African scientists, HIV, and ethics in the ‘global health sciences’},
  author={Johanna T Crane},
  journal={Social Studies of Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={40},
  pages={843 - 870}
}
  • J. Crane
  • Published 1 December 2010
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Social Studies of Science
This paper builds on the growing literature in ‘postcolonial technoscience’ by examining how science and ethics travel in transnational HIV research. I use examples of two controversial US-funded studies of mother-to-child transmission in Africa as case studies through which to explore quandaries of difference and inequality in global health research. My aim is not to adjudicate the debates over these studies, but rather to raise some questions about transnational research, science, and ethics… Expand
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