Adverse Human Health Effects Associated with Molds in the Indoor Environment

@article{Hardin2003AdverseHH,
  title={Adverse Human Health Effects Associated with Molds in the Indoor Environment},
  author={Bryan D. Hardin and Bruce J. Kelman and Andrew J. Saxon},
  journal={Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={45},
  pages={470-478}
}
Molds are common and important allergens. About 5% of individuals are predicted to have some allergic airway symptoms from molds over their lifetime. However, it should be remembered that molds are not dominant allergens and that the outdoor molds, rather than indoor ones, are the most important. For almost all allergic individuals, the reactions will be limited to rhinitis or asthma; sinusitis may occur secondarily due to obstruction. Rarely do sensitized individuals develop uncommon… 
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It is estimated that even up to 30% of buildings worldwide may be the subject of complaints connected with the quality of indoor air. Potential sources of air pollution can be both organic and
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TLDR
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