Advantages of comparative studies in songbirds to understand the neural basis of sensorimotor integration.

@article{Murphy2017AdvantagesOC,
  title={Advantages of comparative studies in songbirds to understand the neural basis of sensorimotor integration.},
  author={Karagh Murphy and Logan S. James and Jon T. Sakata and Jonathan F Prather},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={118 2},
  pages={
          800-816
        }
}
Sensorimotor integration is the process through which the nervous system creates a link between motor commands and associated sensory feedback. This process allows for the acquisition and refinement of many behaviors, including learned communication behaviors such as speech and birdsong. Consequently, it is important to understand fundamental mechanisms of sensorimotor integration, and comparative analyses of this process can provide vital insight. Songbirds offer a powerful comparative model… 

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