Advantages and disadvantages of coloniality in the swallow, Hirundo rustica

@article{Mller1987AdvantagesAD,
  title={Advantages and disadvantages of coloniality in the swallow, Hirundo rustica
},
  author={Anders Pape M{\o}ller},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1987},
  volume={35},
  pages={819-832}
}
  • A. Møller
  • Published 1 June 1987
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract The advantages and disadvantages of coloniality in swallows, Hirundo rustica , were studied in 1971–1975 and 1977–1985. Nest sites were not limiting the local population density, and swallows tended to aggregate actively at specific sites. Colony size was positively correlated with local food abundance and the amount of lee for prevailing westerly winds. The amount of food per individual swallow decreased with colony size, and nestling feeding rates were lower for colonial than for… 
Intraspecific nest parasitism in the swallow Hirundo rustica: the importance of neighbors
  • A. Møller
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Intraspecific nest parasitism in the swallow Hirundo rustica involves several parasite and anti-parasite tactics and Aggression by neighbors may reduce the success of potential parasitic swallows.
COLONY CHOICE IN CLIFF SWALLOWS: EFFECTS OF HETEROGENEITY IN FORAGING HABITAT
TLDR
Findings emphasize that colony choice in Cliff Swallows is complex, reflecting both the socially mediated costs and benefits of group size that vary among individuals and the effects of habitat heterogeneity that may influence food availability at some sites.
Reduced disease in offspring: A benefit of coloniality in sunfish
TLDR
It is shown that disease in offspring of fish may be reduced by nesting in colonies, due in part to a behavioural advantage since colonial males can devote less time to defending eggs and more time to fanning them, which reduces fungal infection.
Overlooked Costs of Coloniality: Mislaid Eggs and the Double Incubation of Separate Nests
TLDR
It is argued the potential to mislay eggs and allocate parental care across separate nests may represent an overlooked cost of colonial nesting in birds.
Infanticidal and anti-infanticidal strategies in the swallow Hirundo rustica
  • A. Møller
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Colonial nests from which the male was removed suffered from infanticide more often than solitary nests, and nests where infanticides was recorded were guarded significantly less intensely than other nests before the infanticidal incidents.
The preening activity of swallows, Hirundo rustica, in relation to experimentally manipulated loads of haematophagous mites
TLDR
Adult swallows did not alter their preening rates in relation to experimental treatment despite the fact that the experimental treatments strongly affected mite densities, and male preening activity was strongly positively correlated with that of their mates.
The preening activity of swallows, Hirundo rustica, in relation to experimentally manipulated loads of haematophagous mites
TLDR
It is evaluated the hypothesis, that preening activity of hosts reflects parasite loads, by manipulating parasite (mite) loads of swallow nests early during reproduction and subsequently recording preeningActivity, that individual hosts should pay particular attention to preening or similar behaviour, which could mirror parasite burdens of potential mates.
Reproductive effort of colonial and solitary breeding tree sparrows Passer montanus L.
TLDR
It is suggested that colonial breeders benefited from the social stimulation of simultaneous feeding in first broods, but the advantage of synchronicity in feeding declined in second broods and the sparser breeding spacing of solitary parents was more advantageous for feeding in second and third broods.
Colonial versus solitary breeding: nesting patterns of Brown-throated Martins Riparia paludicola in Morocco
This study explored reasons for variable nesting habits in a hole-nesting bird species that sometimes breeds colonially and sometimes alone. Nesting was surveyed over ten years in natural sand cliffs
Settlement patterns of female barn swallows Hirundo rustica across different group sizes: access to colorful males or favored nests?
  • R. Safran
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2007
TLDR
It is apparent that female settlement patterns are strongly tied to the availability of old nests at a site, andExtra-pair fertilizations are equally common across all group sizes in this population, suggesting that females do not face a trade-off between old nests and the possibility of extra-pair mating decisions when making settlement decisions.
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References

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TLDR
It is suggested that reduced predation on eggs and young, resulting from both gr ouLp defense and "selfish herd" effects, is an important advantage of Bank Swallow coloniality.
Intraspecific nest parasitism and anti-parasite behaviour in swallows, Hirundo rustica
TLDR
Intraspecific nest parasitism was relatively frequent (overall 16·5% of 261 nests) among swallows, Hirundo rustica, during four consecutive years and was more frequent in large colonies than in groups of 1–4 pairs.
Adaptive significance of synchronized breeding in a colonial bird: a new hypothesis.
TLDR
It is proposed that social foraging plays an important role in maximizing the feeding efficiency in this species and that asynchronous breeding decreases the effectiveness of thissocial foraging, particularly in late nesters and among young, newly fledged birds.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Intraspecific brood parasitism (laying eggs in another's nest) occurs widely in colonial cliff swallows (Passeriformes): in colonies consisting of more than ten nests, up to 24 percent of the nests were sometimes parasitized by colony members.
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TLDR
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Colonial Breeding in the Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) and Its Adaptive Significance
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Overall, house martins were the most sensitive to travel time effects, but in a quantitative test the predicted load size was 20–40% less than the observed size for a range of realistic travel times.
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