Advancing paternal age and risk of autism: new evidence from a population-based study and a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

@article{Hultman2011AdvancingPA,
  title={Advancing paternal age and risk of autism: new evidence from a population-based study and a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies},
  author={Christina M. Hultman and Sven Sandin and Stephen Z. Levine and Paul Lichtenstein and Abraham Reichenberg},
  journal={Molecular Psychiatry},
  year={2011},
  volume={16},
  pages={1203-1212}
}
Advanced paternal age has been suggested as a risk factor for autism, but empirical evidence is mixed. This study examines whether the association between paternal age and autism in the offspring (1) persists controlling for documented autism risk factors, including family psychiatric history, perinatal conditions, infant characteristics and demographic variables; (2) may be explained by familial traits associated with the autism phenotype, or confounding by parity; and (3) is consistent across… 
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