• Corpus ID: 199513704

Advances in wreckfish ( Polyprion americanus ) research : the DIVERSIFY project Why wreckfish ?

@inproceedings{2017AdvancesIW,
  title={Advances in wreckfish ( Polyprion americanus ) research : the DIVERSIFY project Why wreckfish ?},
  author={},
  year={2017}
}
  • Published 2017
  • Environmental Science

References

SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES
Population structure of the wreckfish Polyprion americanus determined with microsatellite genetic markers
TLDR
Allele-frequency distributions at microsatellite loci indicated that samples from the eastern North Atlantic, western North Atlantic and the Mediterranean were genetically similar, confirming the pattern seen in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs).
Slow-release GnRHa treatment prevented atresia during vitellogenesis and induced ovulation of captive wreckfish (Polyprion americanus)
TLDR
The potential of wreckfish to breed in captivity was examined, and present cap- tivity conditions inhibited final oocyte maturation (FOM) and spawning, but not vitellogenesis and spermatogenesis.
Early development of New Zealand hapuku Polyprion oxygeneios eggs and larvae.
This study describes for the first time the normal development of New Zealand hapuku Polyprion oxygeneios embryos and larvae reared from fertilization to 11 days post-hatch (dph) at a constant
Feeding Rates, Growth Performance and Gametogenesis of Wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) kept in Captivity
TLDR
Young wreckfish presented a high growth rate in captivity, thus supporting the feasibility of the species for rearing and further research, however, is required for the reproduction of thespecies.
Growth performance of the wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) in captivity
  • European Aquaculture Society,
  • 2001
First reproduction of captive-reared wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) using GnRH implants
  • European Aquaculture
  • 2008