Advanced optics in a jellyfish eye

@article{Nilsson2005AdvancedOI,
  title={Advanced optics in a jellyfish eye},
  author={Dan-Eric Nilsson and Lars Gisl{\'e}n and Melissa M. Coates and Charlotta Skogh and Anders Garm},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={435},
  pages={201-205}
}
Cubozoans, or box jellyfish, differ from all other cnidarians by an active fish-like behaviour and an elaborate sensory apparatus. Each of the four sides of the animal carries a conspicuous sensory club (the rhopalium), which has evolved into a bizarre cluster of different eyes. Two of the eyes on each rhopalium have long been known to resemble eyes of higher animals, but the function and performance of these eyes have remained unknown. Here we show that box-jellyfish lenses contain a finely… 

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...

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