Advanced abdominal pregnancy: still an occurrence in modern medicine

@article{Roberts2005AdvancedAP,
  title={Advanced abdominal pregnancy: still an occurrence in modern medicine},
  author={R. Roberts and J. Dickinson and Yee Leung and A. Charles},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={45}
}
In a world bewildered by spectacular advances in imaging technology, the early detection of an abdominal pregnancy should be a feasible objective. 
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Abstract Advanced extrauterine (abdominal) pregnancy is extremely rare. Management of such a pregnancy invariably involves a laparotomy under general anesthesia and has never been reported to haveExpand
Advanced twin abdominal pregnancy: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges
TLDR
A case of advanced twin abdominal pregnancy that was diagnosed after failed induction of labor is presented highlighting the diagnostic and hemostatic challenges encountered and the role and limitations of antenatal ultrasound are emphasized. Expand
Full term secondary abdominal pregnancy in a Jehovah’s witness: A case report
We describe a rare case of full term abdominal pregnancy in a Jehovah’s witness patient; she underwent laparotomy successfully without blood transfusion. Despite their belief regarding transfusion,Expand
Re: Should methotrexate be abandoned in the management of placentas left in situ in advanced abdominal pregnancies?
  • O. Oztekin
  • Medicine
  • The Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecology
  • 2006
TLDR
It is believed that rapid shrinkage of the placenta after methotrexate administration leaves behind necrotic tissue which is highly conducive to serious intra-abdominal infections and abscess formations that are very difficult to cope with. Expand
Hemoperitoneum during removal of the placenta in advanced abdominal pregnancy with live fetus delivered at 37 weeks of gestation. A case report in a low-resource setting and literature review
TLDR
In advanced abdominal pregnancy, even in a low-resource setting, the fetus may survive, and to leave the placenta in situ after removal of the fetus, may be a safe option. Expand
Advanced secondary abdominal pregnancy: still an occurrence in modern medicine.
TLDR
A 28-year-old G4P3L3 was referred to us on 31 Jan 2008 with history of 8 months ofamenorrhea and intermittent pain abdomen, and an intrauterine death with transverse lie and central placenta previa, and right-sided fimbriectomy with left-sidedadenexectomy was done. Expand
Ruptured extrauterine pregnancy
TLDR
Despite a reduction in maternal mortality due to ectopic pregnancy in the developed world during the preceding period, it would appear that no further inroads have been made in the last two decades. Expand
Advanced abdominal pregnancy: an increasingly challenging clinical concern for obstetricians.
TLDR
A case of abdominal pregnancy in a woman who was pregnant for the first time, which was further complicated by a concurrent singleton intrauterine pregnancy; the twin pregnancy was not detected until 20 weeks of pregnancy. Expand
Conservative Management and Planned Surgery for Periviable Advanced Extrauterine Abdominal Pregnancy with Favorable Outcome: Report of Two Cases
TLDR
Even in the setting of oligohydramnios and suspected preterm premature rupture of membranes, in-patient conservative management and an individualized planned surgical approach that includes removing or leaving the placenta in place are appropriate for managing the periviable abdominal pregnancy. Expand
Expectant Management of an Abdominal Pregnancy Diagnosed at 18 Weeks: A Case Report
TLDR
Here, it is reported a successful expectant management of an abdominal pregnancy diagnosed at 18 weeks of gestation, which is located in the peritoneal cavity. Expand
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References

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Antenatal diagnosis of a late abdominal pregnancy using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging: a case report of successful outcome
A case of an advanced abdominal pregnancy diagnosed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 21 weeks' gestation is presented. The complementary roles of ultrasound and MRI in achievingExpand
Sonographic follow‐up of a placenta left in situ after delivery of the fetus in an abdominal pregnancy
  • J. Bajo, A. Garcia-Frutos, M. Huertas
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  • Ultrasound in obstetrics & gynecology : the official journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
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A case of abdominal pregnancy was followed until 34 weeks' gestation, when rupture of the amniotic sac was noted. A live and anatomically normal female weighing 1400 g was delivered by laparotomy andExpand
Abdominal Pregnancy: Current Concepts of Management
TLDR
Nine cases of early and six cases of advanced abdominal pregnancy managed at the University of Mississippi Medical Center over a 20-year period are reviewed, finding difficulty in diagnosis, predisposing risk factors, suggestive signs and symptoms, and the diagnostic role of ultrasound. Expand
Diagnosis and management of abdominal pregnancy. A case report.
TLDR
State-of-the-art imaging and prenatal diagnostic techniques allowed correct diagnosis, adequate preparation and optimal management of this dangerous condition. Expand
Minimally Invasive Management of an Advanced Abdominal Pregnancy
TLDR
This report demonstrates successful minimally invasive management of an advanced abdominal pregnancy with a multimodal approach that included preoperative arterial embolization, laparoscopically assisted delivery, and judicious use of postoperative methotrexate. Expand
Long‐term follow‐up after removal of an abdominal pregnancy: ultrasound evaluation of the involuting placenta.
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TLDR
Intra-abdominal pregnancy is a rare event, estimated to occur in between 1 in 3,000 and 1 in 15,000 live births and in 1.6 per cent ofall ectopic gestations, mainly due to rupture of an ectopic pregnancy, usually from the fallopian tube. Expand
Successful outcome of advanced abdominal pregnancy with exclusive omental insertion
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TLDR
There is a paucity of research on suitable clinical investigations prognostic for abdominal pregnancy, although this case provides further evidence for the use of Doppler as a useful surveillance tool in such cases and propagates the ethical and clinical controversy that exists in managing abdominal pregnancy. Expand
Advanced Abdominal Pregnancy- Observations in 10 Cases
TLDR
Advanced abdominal pregnancy was encountered 10 times in 102,000 deliveries over a period of 10 years at 1 hospital, and the value of this drug in managing the abdominal placenta could not be established. Expand
Advanced abdominal pregnancy — A review of 23 cases
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  • Irish journal of medical science
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TLDR
Abnormal presentation of the fetus, displacement of the cervix and anaemia were the most common clinical features and partial removal of the placenta is the most hazardous procedure and should not be undertaken. Expand
Abdominal Pregnancy in the United States: Frequency and Maternal Mortality
TLDR
Only one of nine women who reached the hospital alive had an accurate preoperative diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy, which suggests that preventing abdominal pregnancy-related death may depend, at least in part, upon increasing physicians' awareness of its clinical features. Expand
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