Advanced Glycation End Products and Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease

@article{Prasad2012AdvancedGE,
  title={Advanced Glycation End Products and Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease},
  author={Anand Prasad and P. Bekker and S. Tsimikas},
  journal={Cardiology in Review},
  year={2012},
  volume={20},
  pages={177–183}
}
Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed by a nonenzymatic reaction of sugar moieties (eg, glucose, fructose, glycolytic adducts) with the free amino groups on amino acid residues of proteins. A growing body of data demonstrate that AGEs are intimately involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease by stimulating inflammation, contributing to atheroma formation, and modulating vascular stiffness. The role of AGEs as potential biomarkers for disease presence and prognosis in… Expand
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