Adult male bolas spiders retain juvenile hunting tactics

@article{Yeargan1997AdultMB,
  title={Adult male bolas spiders retain juvenile hunting tactics},
  author={Kenneth V. Yeargan and Laurence W. Quate},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={1997},
  volume={112},
  pages={572-576}
}
Abstract Bolas spiders in the genus Mastophora exhibit extreme sexual size dimorphism. In temperate regions, the diminutive males become adults about 2 months before females mature. Late-instar and adult females attract certain male moths by aggressive chemical mimicry of those moth species' sex pheromones. While hunting, these larger female spiders hang from a horizontal silken line and capture moths by swinging a “bolas” (i.e., a sticky globule suspended on a thread) at the approaching moths… 
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