Adult Crossed Aphasia in Dextrals Revisited

@article{Marin2004AdultCA,
  title={Adult Crossed Aphasia in Dextrals Revisited},
  author={Peter Mari{\"e}n and Barbara Paghera and Peter Paul De Deyn and Luigi Amedeo Vignolo},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2004},
  volume={40},
  pages={41-74}
}
The clinical study of crossed aphasia in dextrals (CAD) may shed light on the discreteness and modularity of several cognitive functions, such as language, gestures and visual spatial abilities, with respect to hemispheric lateralisation. Since 1975 over 180 cases have been described, employing, however, different criteria of assessment and classification. The purpose of this paper is to review them and to propose a set of diagnostic criteria that may be useful to single out a series of… Expand
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There is no agreement about pathogenesis of CAD and neural mechanism is still unclear, but considering the clinical symptomatology, it can be argued that the patient observed a non-fluent aphasia. Expand
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This case-report is the first reliable representative of vascular CAD following an isolated lesion in the right thalamus and a detailed analysis of linguistic and cognitive impairments of ‘possible’ and 'reliable' subcortical CAD-cases published since 1975 is presented. Expand
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Cognitive impairments associated with crossed aphasia were investigated in a single case study and a review of the literature. A review of literature identifies 4 main cognitive co-morbidities thatExpand
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Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali
  • D. Lahiri, S. Dubey, +4 authors A. Ardila
  • Medicine
  • Cognitive and behavioral neurology : official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology
  • 2019
TLDR
The relatively high incidence of CA in the Bengali language suggests that bi-hemispheric language representation may be more prevalent in Bengali speakers than in speakers of other languages. Expand
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