Adult Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata var. domestica) require real-time auditory feedback to produce normal song syntax.

@article{Okanoya1997AdultBF,
  title={Adult Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata var. domestica) require real-time auditory feedback to produce normal song syntax.},
  author={Kazuo Okanoya and Ayako Yamaguchi},
  journal={Journal of neurobiology},
  year={1997},
  volume={33 4},
  pages={
          343-56
        }
}
Songbirds develop their songs by imitating songs of adults. For song learning to proceed normally, the bird's hearing must remain intact throughout the song development process. In many species, song learning takes place during one period early in life, and no more new song elements are learned thereafter. In these so-called close-ended learners, it has long been assumed that once song development is complete, audition is no longer necessary to maintain the motor patterns of full song. However… Expand
The Role of Auditory Feedback in the Maintenance of Song in Adult Male Bengalese Finches Lonchura striata var. domestica
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It is suggested that adult male Bengalese finches need auditory feedback in order to maintain their normal songs and that this feedback is involved in retaining the syllables of higher fundamental frequencies. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is hypothesize that a mutation in the song control nucleus occurred in the domestic strain that enabled the development of complex song syntax, and that this mutation became fixed in the Domestic population through sexual selection. Expand
Song Motor control organizes acoustic patterns on two levels in Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata var. domestica)
TLDR
It is suggested that the associations among the song syllables that compose the statistically stereotyped sequences are more order dependent than those for the statistically variable sequences, and the tolerances of syllable pairs to visual interruptions are consistent with the statistical song structures. Expand
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