Adsorptive Iron Removal from Groundwater

@inproceedings{Sharma2021AdsorptiveIR,
  title={Adsorptive Iron Removal from Groundwater},
  author={S. K. Sharma},
  year={2021}
}
Iron is commonly present in groundwater worldwide. The presence of iron in drinking water is not harmful to human health, however it is undesirable because of the associated aesthetic and operational problems, namely: bad taste, colour, stains on laundry and plumbing fixtures, and aftergrowth in the distribution system. Iron is generally removed from groundwater by the process of aeration followed by rapid sand fihration. This study reveals that two mechanisms are involved in this process… 

Removal of both dissolved and particulate iron from groundwater

Iron is the primary source for discolouration problems in the drinking water distribution system. The removal of iron from groundwater is a common treatment step in the production of drinking water.

Iron removal at groundwater pumping station Harderbroek

Iron is the primary source for discolouration problems in the drinking water distribution system. The removal of iron from groundwater is a common treatment step in the production of drinking water.

A REVIEW ON REMOVAL OF IRON FROM GROUNDWATER

The presence of iron in groundwater, eventually in drinking water, has been recognized as a serious community health problem due to its high toxic nature and therefore, its removal is highly

Oxidation of adsorbed ferrous iron: kinetics and influence of process conditions.

Investigation of the effect of pH on the rate of oxidation of adsorbed Fe(2 + ) on iron oxide coated sand (IOCS) in a short filter column found that at feedwater pH 5, 6 and 7 the pH in the effluent was higher than in the influent, while at pH 8, the pH dropped, attributed to the presence of calcium and /or ferrous carbonate in IOCS.

Investigating subsurface iron and arsenic removal: anoxic column experiments to explore efficiency parameters

High concentrations of arsenic in drinking water form a major threat for public health in more than 70 countries worldwide. The situation is Bangladesh is seen as the worst incidence of arsenic