Adrenalectomy in dogs with adrenal gland tumors: 52 cases (2002-2008).

@article{Massari2011AdrenalectomyID,
  title={Adrenalectomy in dogs with adrenal gland tumors: 52 cases (2002-2008).},
  author={Federico Massari and S. Nicoli and Giorgio Romanelli and Paolo Buracco and Eric Zini},
  journal={Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
  year={2011},
  volume={239 2},
  pages={
          216-21
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To evaluate predictors of survival time in dogs undergoing adrenalectomy and identify risk factors associated with adrenal gland tumor metastasis and vein thrombosis. [] Key MethodDESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 52 dogs with primary adrenal gland tumors. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed.

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