Adopting a New Religion: The Case of Protestantism in 16th Century Germany

@article{Cantoni2012AdoptingAN,
  title={Adopting a New Religion: The Case of Protestantism in 16th Century Germany},
  author={Davide Cantoni},
  journal={Urban Economics \& Regional Studies eJournal},
  year={2012}
}
  • Davide Cantoni
  • Published 1 May 2012
  • History
  • Urban Economics & Regional Studies eJournal
Using a rich dataset of territories and cities of the Holy Roman Empire in the 16th century, this paper investigates the determinants of adoption and diffusion of Protestantism as a state religion. A territory’s distance to Wittenberg, the city where Martin Luther taught, is a major determinant of adoption. This finding can be explained through a theory of strategic neighbourhood interactions: in an uncertain legal context, introducing the Reformation was a risky enterprise for territorial… 
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