Adjusting global extinction rates to account for taxonomic susceptibility

@inproceedings{Wang2008AdjustingGE,
  title={Adjusting global extinction rates to account for taxonomic susceptibility},
  author={S. Wang and A. M. Bush},
  year={2008}
}
  • S. Wang, A. M. Bush
  • Published 2008
  • Geology
  • Abstract Studies of extinction in the fossil record commonly involve comparisons of taxonomic extinction rates, often expressed as the percentage of taxa (e.g., families or genera) going extinct in a time interval. Such extinction rates may be influenced by factors that do not reflect the intrinsic severity of an extinction trigger. Two identical triggering events (e.g., bolide impacts, sea level changes, volcanic eruptions) could lead to different taxonomic extinction rates depending on… CONTINUE READING
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