• Corpus ID: 1350040

Adhesion of Conidia of Drechmeria coniospora to Caenorhabditis elegans Wild Type and Mutants.

@article{Jansson1994AdhesionOC,
  title={Adhesion of Conidia of Drechmeria coniospora to Caenorhabditis elegans Wild Type and Mutants.},
  author={H B Jansson},
  journal={Journal of nematology},
  year={1994},
  volume={26 4},
  pages={
          430-5
        }
}
  • H. Jansson
  • Published 1 December 1994
  • Biology
  • Journal of nematology
Adhesion of conidia of the endoparasitic fungus Drechmeria coniospora to the cuticles of the wild type and four different head defective mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans, and subsequent infection, was studied. The conidia adhered around the sensory structures in the head region, vulva, and occasionally to other parts of the cuticle in both mutant and wild type hosts. Infection took place after adhesion to the head region by penetration through the cuticle, and, following adhesion around the… 

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