Adherence to directly observed antiretroviral therapy among human immunodeficiency virus-infected prison inmates.

Abstract

Directly observed therapy (DOT) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is commonly used in correctional settings; however, the efficacy of DOT for treating HIV infection has not been determined. We prospectively assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens among 31 HIV-infected prison inmates who were receiving >or=1 antiretrovirals via DOT. Adherence was measured by self-report, pill count, electronic monitoring caps, and, for DOT only, medication administration records. Overall, median adherence was 90%, as measured by pill count; 86%, by electronic monitoring caps; and 100%, by self-report. Adherence, as measured by electronic monitoring caps, was >90% in 32% of the subjects. In 91% of cases, adherence, as measured by medication administration records, was greater than that recorded by electronic monitoring caps for the same medications administered by DOT. Objective methods of measurement revealed that adherence to antiretroviral regimens administered wholly or in part by DOT was <or=90% in more than one-half of the patients. Different methods used to measure adherence revealed significantly different levels of adherence. These findings suggest that use of DOT does not ensure adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

Cite this paper

@article{Wohl2003AdherenceTD, title={Adherence to directly observed antiretroviral therapy among human immunodeficiency virus-infected prison inmates.}, author={David A Wohl and Becky L Stephenson and Carol E. Golin and C. Nichole Kiziah and David L. Rosen and Bich Ngo and Honghu Liu and Andrew H. Kaplan}, journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America}, year={2003}, volume={36 12}, pages={1572-6} }