Adenosine triphosphate in cholinergic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of electrophorus electricus

@article{Zimmermann1976AdenosineTI,
  title={Adenosine triphosphate in cholinergic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of electrophorus electricus
},
  author={Heike Zimmermann and C. R. Denston},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={1976},
  volume={111},
  pages={365-376}
}

Acetylcholine, ATP, and Proteoglycan Are Common to Synaptic Vesicles Isolated from the Electric Organs of Electric Eel and Electric Catfish as Well as from Rat Diaphragm

ACh, ATP, and proteoglycan are common molecular constituents of motor nerve terminal‐derived synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to rat and may play a specific role in the process of cholinergic signal transmission.

Coexistence of adenosine 5′-triphosphate and acetylcholine in the electromotor synapse

The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the presynaptic nerve terminal in the form of quantal packets and is hydrolysed to form choline and acetate, which would appear to be satisfactory for maintaining physiological levels of activation of the effector system.

The Synaptic Vesicle

The synaptic vesicles of the electromotor nerve terminals in the electric organ of Torpedo are larger than normal; these vesicle can be isolated relatively easily in bulk and high purity and have thus provided an important source material for most of the recent work on the biochemistry and biophysics of synaptic vesa.

Hydrolysis of ATP and Formation of Adenosine at the Surface of Cholinergic Nerve Endings

Etononucleotidase activity has been described in fractions of intact nerve endings (synaptosomes) isolated from either mammalian or chicken brain or from the electric organ of the electric ray Torpedo marmorata.

References

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Adenosine triphosphate. A constituent of cholinergic synaptic vesicles.

Synaptic vesicles separated by density-gradient centrifugation from extracts of the cholinergic nerve terminals of the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata were found to contain appreciable amounts of ATP as well as acetylcholine, suggesting some degree of chemical heterogeneity in the vesicle population.

The isolation of pure cholinergic synaptic vesicles from the electric organs of elasmobranch fish of the family Torpedinidae.

1. Zonal centrifuging permitted the separation, on the milligram scale and in a form largely free from contamination by soluble cytoplasmic protein or membrane fragments derived from other

THE ISOLATION OF CHOLINERGIC SYNAPTIC VESICLES FROM BOVINE SUPERIOR CERVICAL GANGLION AND ESTIMATION OF THEIR ACETYLCHOLINE CONTENT

The vesicle subfraction from the gradient had an acetylcholine (ACh) content of 4.4 nmol/mg of protein and were subject to leakage of ACh and an ACh content of 1630 molecules/vesicle was estimated.

Absence of adenine nucleotide release from autonomic ganglion

Tests for the release of ATP and ACh from the cat superior cervical ganglion are reported and it is demonstrated that ACh, but not ATP, is released during stimulation.

On the association between transmitter secretion and the release of adenine nucleotides from mammalian motor nerve terminals.

The results in conjunction with experiments on the hydrolysis of exogenous ATP suggest that ATP is released from the motor nerve ending and is subsequently degraded by enzymatic activity.

EFFECT OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON THE YIELD AND COMPOSITION OF SYNAPTIC VESICLES FROM THE CHOLINERGIC SYNAPSES OF THE ELECTRIC ORGAN OF TORPEDO: A COMBINED BIOCHEMICAL, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY

The electric organ of Torpedo marmorata, anaesthetized with 0.01% Tricaine methane sulphonate, by means of electrical stimulation administered via an electrode placed on the electric lobe has been studied electrophysiologically, biochemically and morphologically.

Electron-dense Particle in Cholinergic Synaptic Vesicles

Electron micrographs of known cholinergic nerve terminals at mammalian neuromuscular and torpedine neuroelectroplaque junctions show large populations of synaptic vesicles having diameters of about 400 and 800 Å respectively but with no evidence of a core structure.

The biochemistry of cholinergic synapses as exemplified by the electric organ of Torpedo.

The electric organ of Torpedo (Fig. 1) consists of two masses of gelatinous tissue disposed one on each side of the head, having a honeycomb structure when viewed from above. Each “cell” of the

Adenosinephosphates and inorganic phosphate in the adrenaline and noradrenaline containing granules of the adrenal medulla.

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  • Biology, Chemistry
    Acta physiologica Scandinavica
  • 1958
The osmotic properties of the granules and the amine content found in them make it necessary to assume that the amines are incorporated, together with the adenosinephosphates, in a complex molecular structure which prevents them from forming free ions or molecules in the intragranular water.