Additive opportunistic capture explains group hunting benefits in African wild dogs

@article{Hubel2016AdditiveOC,
  title={Additive opportunistic capture explains group hunting benefits in African wild dogs},
  author={Tatjana Y. Hubel and Julia P. Myatt and Neil R. Jordan and Oliver P. Dewhirst and J. Weldon Mcnutt and Alan M. Wilson},
  journal={Nature Communications},
  year={2016},
  volume={7}
}
African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are described as highly collaborative endurance pursuit hunters based on observations derived primarily from the grass plains of East Africa. However, the remaining population of this endangered species mainly occupies mixed woodland savannah where hunting strategies appear to differ from those previously described. We used high-resolution GPS and inertial technology to record fine-scale movement of all members of a single pack of six adult African wild dogs in… Expand

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