Addiction as accomplishment: The discursive construction of disease

@article{Reinarman2005AddictionAA,
  title={Addiction as accomplishment: The discursive construction of disease},
  author={Craig Reinarman},
  journal={Addiction Research \& Theory},
  year={2005},
  volume={13},
  pages={307 - 320}
}
  • C. Reinarman
  • Published 1 August 2005
  • Sociology
  • Addiction Research & Theory
The ubiquity of the disease concept of addiction obscures the fact that it did not emerge from the accretion of scientific discoveries. Addiction-as-disease has been continuously redefined, mostly in the direction of conceptual elasticity, such that it now yields an embarrassment of riches: a growing range of allegedly addictive phenomena which do not involve drugs. This article begins with questions that have been raised about whether “addiction” is a discrete disease entity with a distinct… 

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addiction among health care practitioners Contingencies of the will : Uses of harm reduction and the disease model of

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Through analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with 13 health care practitioners who provide care for economically marginalized people who use drugs in New York City, it was found that the absence of will articulated in constructions of addiction as disease offered a gateway through which health Care practitioners could bring in ideological commitments associated with harm reduction, such as the de-stigmatization of drug use.
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