Addiction and the brain antireward system.

@article{Koob2008AddictionAT,
  title={Addiction and the brain antireward system.},
  author={George F. Koob and Michel Le Moal},
  journal={Annual review of psychology},
  year={2008},
  volume={59},
  pages={
          29-53
        }
}
  • G. KoobM. Le Moal
  • Published 10 January 2008
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Annual review of psychology
A neurobiological model of the brain emotional systems has been proposed to explain the persistent changes in motivation that are associated with vulnerability to relapse in addiction, and this model may generalize to other psychopathology associated with dysregulated motivational systems. In this framework, addiction is conceptualized as a cycle of decreased function of brain reward systems and recruitment of antireward systems that progressively worsen, resulting in the compulsive use of… 

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