Adaptive responses to muscle lengthening and shortening in humans.

@article{Hortobgyi1996AdaptiveRT,
  title={Adaptive responses to muscle lengthening and shortening in humans.},
  author={Tibor Hortob{\'a}gyi and Judsen P. Hill and Joseph A. Houmard and Douglas D. Fraser and N. J. Lambert and Richard Gay Israel},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={80 3},
  pages={765-72}
}
We tested the hypothesis that exercise training with maximal eccentric (lengthening) muscle actions results in greater gains in muscle strength and size than training with concentric (shortening) actions. Changes in muscle strength, muscle fiber size, and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the quadriceps muscle were compared after 36 sessions of isokinetic concentric (n = 8) or eccentric (n = 7) exercise training over 12 wk with use of a one-leg model. Eccentric training increased… CONTINUE READING
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