Adaptive evolution and phenotypic plasticity during naturalization and spread of invasive species: implications for tree invasion biology

@article{Zenni2013AdaptiveEA,
  title={Adaptive evolution and phenotypic plasticity during naturalization and spread of invasive species: implications for tree invasion biology},
  author={Rafael Dudeque Zenni and Jean‐Baptiste Lamy and Laurent J. Lamarque and Annabel J. Porte},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2013},
  volume={16},
  pages={635-644}
}
Although the genetic aspects of biological invasions are receiving more attention in the scientific literature, analyses of phenotypic plasticity and genotype-by-environment interactions are still seldom considered in tree invasion biology. Previous studies have shown that invasions of tree species can be affected by intraspecific phenotypic plasticity, pre-adaptation, and post-introduction evolution, and we suggest there are opportunities for new developments in this field. Here, we present a… Expand

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