Adaptive divergence in the Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus): a mainland versus island comparison of morphology and foraging behaviour

@article{Schlotfeldt2006AdaptiveDI,
  title={Adaptive divergence in the Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus): a mainland versus island comparison of morphology and foraging behaviour},
  author={Beth E. Schlotfeldt and Sonia Kleindorfer},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2006},
  volume={106},
  pages={309 - 319}
}
Abstract Understanding patterns of adaptive divergence is a cornerstone for understanding the process of speciation. The theory of ecological speciation predicts that natural selection shapes adaptive divergence. In this observational study, we examined the first phase of ecological speciation, namely adaptive divergence in foraging behaviour and morphology across populations (island and mainland sites) of the sexually dimorphic Superb Fairy- wren (Malurus cyaneus) that have been separated for… 
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