Adaptive auditory risk assessment in the dogbane tiger moth when pursued by bats

@article{Ratcliffe2010AdaptiveAR,
  title={Adaptive auditory risk assessment in the dogbane tiger moth when pursued by bats},
  author={John M Ratcliffe and James H. Fullard and Ben J. Arthur and Ronald R. Hoy},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={278},
  pages={364 - 370}
}
Moths and butterflies flying in search of mates risk detection by numerous aerial predators; under the cover of night, the greatest threat will often be from insectivorous bats. During such encounters, the toxic dogbane tiger moth, Cycnia tenera uses the received intensity, duration and emission pattern of the bat's echolocation calls to determine when, and how many, defensive ultrasonic clicks to produce in return. These clicks, which constitute an acoustic startle response, act as warning… 
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