Adaptive Radiation in Insects and Plants: Time and Opportunity

@article{Farrell1994AdaptiveRI,
  title={Adaptive Radiation in Insects and Plants: Time and Opportunity},
  author={Brian D. Farrell and Charles Mitter},
  journal={Integrative and Comparative Biology},
  year={1994},
  volume={34},
  pages={57-69}
}
  • B. Farrell, C. Mitter
  • Published 1 February 1994
  • Environmental Science, Biology
  • Integrative and Comparative Biology
SYNOPSIS. Insects and their hostplants represent the major part of terrestrial diversity, yet we are just beginning to understand why there are so very many species. By far the most influential model of insect/plant diversification has been Ehrlich and Raven's (1964) hypothesis of insect/plant coevolution. While the coevolution model was based on macroevolutionary patterns in plant defenses and hostplant affiliations, most of the subsequent work has been on its possible ecological and genetic… 
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