Adaptations and Dispersals of Anatomically Modern Humans in the Changing Environments of North Africa: the Contribution of Microvertebrates

@article{Stoetzel2017AdaptationsAD,
  title={Adaptations and Dispersals of Anatomically Modern Humans in the Changing Environments of North Africa: the Contribution of Microvertebrates},
  author={Emmanuelle Stoetzel},
  journal={African Archaeological Review},
  year={2017},
  volume={34},
  pages={453-468}
}
  • E. Stoetzel
  • Published 9 November 2017
  • Geography
  • African Archaeological Review
There is limited available data on the environmental context of the arrival of the first anatomically modern humans (AMH) in North Africa, and subsequent Paleolithic and Neolithic occupations within this region. Microvertebrates such as rodents, shrews, amphibians, and squamates are known to be good indicators of climate and landscape changes. They also represent continental paleoecological records that can be directly related to human occupations. Moreover, faunas and humans have been… 
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